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Wet AMD FAQs

Find answers to your frequently asked questions
about wet AMD.

In a rush? You can also print a version of these FAQs here

What is wet AMD?

Wet age-related macular degeneration, or wet AMD, can result when abnormal blood vessels begin to grow and leak blood and fluid beneath a part of the eye. This leakage can lead to permanent visual impairment in as little as 3 months if not properly treated. Currently there is no cure, and even inadequate treatment can result in tissue scarring that can cause significant vision loss. In fact, wet AMD is the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 55 in the United States and Europe.

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Why do I have wet AMD?

Wet AMD has several risk factors. Your chances of getting wet AMD increase as you age, and females are more likely to develop wet AMD than males. Other risk factors include:

  • Genetics
  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Exposure to UV light

Learn more about risk factors

Is there a cure for wet AMD?

Currently, there is no cure for wet AMD. However, there are effective treatments available. Laser surgery, photodynamic therapy (PDT), anti-angiogenic, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatments give patients several options to choose from to help create a successful treatment plan.

Learn more about treatments

How can I decrease my risk for wet AMD?

There are several ways you can decrease your risk for wet AMD:

  • Do not smoke/quit smoking
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise regularly
  • Monitor your diet
  • Take dietary supplements
  • Reduce exposure to UV light
  • Get regular check-ups with your doctor

Learn more about decreasing risk

How do I know if I have wet AMD?

The signs of wet AMD are often similar from patient to patient. Symptoms of wet AMD include:

  • Blurry vision
  • Straight lines appearing wavy, distorted, or fractured
  • Difficulty distinguishing colors or contrasts
  • Sensitivity to bright lights
  • Close work (knitting or reading) becomes impossible

Learn about symptoms

How can I find support for wet AMD?

There are many organizations prepared to help people looking for support for wet AMD. Some national organizations may host events in or near your area that you can attend, and others may even have a local branch that you can consult for support.

Find support resources

What is a retina specialist?

A retina specialist is a doctor highly trained in diseases of the eye, including wet AMD. He/she can help diagnose and recommend treatment for wet AMD and can be a valuable resource by providing information and answering your questions.

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DME FAQs

Find answers to your questions about DME.

In a rush? You can also print a version of these FAQs here

What is DME?

Diabetic macular edema, or DME, develops from an eye condition called diabetic retinopathy, or DR. It is a leading cause of vision loss in people with diabetes and can develop at any stage of DR. DME is associated with swelling or thickening of the retina and leaking of blood and fluid into the macula, a small area in the back of the eye that allows for sharpness of vision. This sets a number of processes into motion, including triggering high levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, called VEGF. Excess VEGF contributes to leaky blood vessels and ultimately cause the macula to swell and thicken.

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Is there a cure for DME?

Currently, there is no cure for DME. However there are effective treatments available. These include anti-VEGF-A and anti-angiogenic treatments that attack factors that contribute to DME, focal laser photocoagulation which stabilises vision, vitrectomy, a procedure that helps improve visual acuity, and corticosteroid therapy that works by targeting different mechanisms of the disease.

Learn more about DME treatment

How can I decrease my risk for DME?

There are several important things you can do to help reduce your risk of DME. These include addressing the underlying factors that contribute to DME, including monitoring and controlling your blood glucose level, your blood pressure, and your cholesterol and lipids. This can be achieved by following your doctor’s instructions and taking any medications he or she recommends, as prescribed.

Learn more about decreasing your risk of DME

How do I know if I have DME?

If DME has advanced to the point where there are symptoms, these may include patches of vision loss, blurry vision, or colours that look washed out or faded. At the first sign of these symptoms, it is very important to see an eye specialist in order to have the best chance to preserve your vision.

Learn more about symptoms of DME

How can I find support for DME?

There are many organisations prepared to help people looking for support for DME. Some national organisations may host events in or near your area that you can attend, and others may even have a local branch that you can consult for support.

Find Support

What is a retina specialist?

A retina specialist is a doctor highly trained in diseases of the eye and DME. He/she can help diagnose and recommend treatment for DME and can be a valuable resource by providing information and answering your questions.